Hemp is a long-forgotten natural fiber plant

Textile history and current state.

Today, as we are passionate about fashion, we must understand that behind the beauty and variety of clothing, far from the catwalks and billboards, lies a huge industry and shrewd propaganda. To understand the magnitude of this global dimension, it is helpful to delve a little deeper into the history of textiles.


Our ancestors created textile surfaces exclusively by hand. The first historically known woven fabric appears to have been made from hemp, the processing of which began in the 8th millennium (8000-7000 BC). Once upon a time, at the funerals of pharaohs and saints, they were wrapped in thin fabrics of hemp and flax.
The Persian Empire was renowned for producing the finest and finest fabrics. Even then, traders met at a transshipment point in Israel, which is now known as the Gaza Strip. The 6,400 km Silk Road, a caravan route, connected Central Asia with East Asia and served, among other things, for the trade in fine natural fabrics of silk and wool since 115 BC.

From these very old historical traditions, it can be inferred that our ancestors knew the appropriate manual processing steps to process natural fibers in a high quality manner.
Columbus discovered America in 1492. Without using the strongest natural fiber, hemp, he probably would not have been able to swim across the Atlantic. At the time, hemp ropes and hemp sails were used in shipbuilding around the world.

From the beginning of the Middle Ages from 1200-1700. Swiss linen fabrics were produced as an exclusive export commodity. In 1239, the first evidence of linen processing in Switzerland appeared. White Gold has been a wedding for centuries and has brought wealth to farmers, workers and traders. A trading network was created from Africa to Russia and Turkey.

In 1750, increased cotton processing was favored. All machine technology has been launched to match this fiber. So slowly but surely the preference for this plant crept in. Plants that provide regional autonomy, such as hemp, flax and nettle, are being systematically replaced.

Of course, processing methods have changed over the millennia. In 1764, the development of the first industrial spinning machine, Spinning Jenny, revolutionized the textile sector. What used to employ 100 spinners has now been replaced by one machine. The high productivity increase over the spinning wheel is considered a milestone in the industrial revolution and the history of technology. Since then, many more developments in textile machines have followed. Within a few years, a sharp decline in jobs began, and the age of machines in the textile industry increased significantly.

When chemical and cotton fibers were used in fiber production after World War II, hemp textiles, hemp ropes and canvas began to be systematically replaced around the world. Hemp has been a great competitor to local oil and chemical companies. Since the plant grows almost everywhere, it cannot be easily monopolized and controlled. The simultaneous introduction of the taboo story of “marijuana” made it easy to scare the population away from the plant. As a result of wars and progressive industrialization, most of the old and reliable fiber processing machines around the world have been scrapped. The rest is found mainly in Russia and the Eastern Bloc countries, as well as in China. In Central Europe, most of the remaining equipment is in textile museums. Very few companies have incorporated old machines into day-to-day business. It is necessary to be aware of this state of the art in order to understand why it is tedious these days to rebuild the textile chain for plants from natural fibers such as hemp, flax and nettle. This also explains the lack of hemp clothing in the global market. The technical capabilities for processing plant fibers into products must again be fully restored.

Since the textile chain is so long, it requires a lot of financial capital as well as knowledge and coordinated processes. It takes up to 40 machines to make a finished T-shirt to go from fiber growing to final product. It is necessary to be aware of this state of the art in order to understand why it is tedious these days to rebuild the textile chain for plants from natural fibers such as hemp, flax and nettle. This also explains the lack of hemp clothing in the global market. The technical possibilities of processing plant fibers into products must again be fully restored. Since the textile chain is very long, it requires considerable financial capital, as well as knowledge and coordination.rooted processes. It takes up to 40 machines to make a finished T-shirt from fiber cultivation to the final product. It is necessary to be aware of this state of the art in order to understand why a lengthy process of restoring the textile chain for plants from natural fibers such as hemp, flax and nettle is required these days. This also explains the lack of hemp clothing in the global market.

The technical capabilities for processing plant fibers into products must again be fully restored. Since the textile chain is so long, it requires a lot of financial capital as well as knowledge and coordinated processes. It takes up to 40 machines to make a finished T-shirt to go from fiber growing to final product. This also explains the lack of hemp clothing in the global market. The technical capabilities for processing plant fibers into products must again be fully restored. Since the textile chain is so long, it requires a lot of financial capital as well as knowledge and coordinated processes. It takes up to 40 machines to make a finished T-shirt from fiber cultivation to the final product. This also explains the lack of hemp clothing in the global market. The technical capabilities for processing plant fibers into products must again be fully restored. Since the textile chain is so long, it requires a lot of financial capital as well as knowledge and coordinated processes. It takes up to 40 machines to make a finished T-shirt to go from fiber growing to final product.

Due to strict seed regulation, valuable old textile varieties are unfortunately currently lost or cannot be grown as they often contain more than 0.2% THC. Although there are varieties on the EU list that can be used for growing textiles, there are probably more suitable ones. Wherever there is strong support for the release in the debate about legalizing smoking, there is unfortunately little talk of replacing old valuable textiles. But it is during the growing process that the quality of the fibers is determined.

The properties of hemp are comfort.

Hildegard von Bingen has already written about the magical powers of cannabis. At the time, she used hemp towels as a gauze bandage for dressing wounds. The variety of uses for cannabis trumps every other plant / raw material on this planet. This indescribable power can be found in all imaginable natural hemp products and can be felt right away.
Hemp clothing for leather is like a Caribbean vacation. The microelectric voltage of the hemp fiber is the same as that of the skin. Wearing hemp fabric does not irritate the surface of the skin and is therefore especially suitable for skin-sensitive people with neurodermatitis or redness and may even relieve psoriasis symptoms.

It gives people a sense of integrity. Clients often describe this feeling as “coming home” in their own body. The unaccustomed comfort of wearing hemp clothing is initially unaccustomed to the body, but hardly felt limiting or overwhelming. After a very short time, the clothes melt on the body and become a second skin.

The capillary action of the fiber gives it a certain breathability and does not allow the body to feel wet. Hemp clothing regulates the temperature. Hemp clothing is also highly recommended as functional underwear. The antibacterial properties always create a pleasant body odor. Hemp clothing can be worn several times in a row without washing. Enough airing at night. This fiber ability is especially noticeable in hemp socks. The feet are an important part of the body that is responsible for removing our toxins. In addition, plastic shoes are often worn by our feet these days. This usually creates an unpleasant odor in that area of ​​the body. This does not apply to hemp socks.
The old traditions also talk about the function of protection from external energetic influences, such as electrosmog today. However, there is no scientific research in this regard yet.

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